Oregon District of the United Pentecostal Church Int'l

North American Missions

Purpose & Vision

Until Jesus comes, North American Missions needs to be in the forefront of our collective consciousness. The future is bright; more preachers than ever are expressing an interest in becoming church planters. The story of North American Missions is one of visionary success and vitality.

Some UPCI History

In 1952, there were 1,321 UPCI churches; today there are more than 4,000 UPCI churches in North America.

In 1952, the North American population was 181,981,356; today there are 388,000,000 people.

In 1952, the ratio was one church per 137,760 people; today the ratio is one church per 97,000 people.

North American Missions works!

Purpose & Vision

To Acquaint our constituency with just how under-evangelized North America is. As of 2009, 38 countries around the world report having more churches per capita than we have in the United States and Canada.

To Promote the effectiveness of new churches as an evangelistic tool. From our last survey, North American Missions churches averaged 38.6 in Sunday attendance. The attendees are people who generally would not have been in church less than five years ago. Across the board, no other church growth effort is as effective as starting another church.

To Establish a broader base to fund North American Missions. Friends of American Missions is a monthly partnership that funds Mission North America, namupci.com and other resources. Endowment funds have been established and donor-directed funds have been received. This is another tiny seed that will eventually be a mighty oak.

To Raise the profile of church planters in each district. What gets honored gets repeated. Every newly-licensed preacher in every district should be given the opportunity to consider planting a church.

nam-oregon-logo-01

District Officials

Dave Bragg
David Bragg

N.A.M Director
braggd238@yahoo.com

Kevin & Terina Neu
Kevin Neu

N.A.M Secretary
kevinneu76@hotmail.com

Dallas Brock
Dallas Brock

Section 1 Director
orglobalmissions@gmail.com

Scott Haskett
Scott Haskett

Section 2 Director
scottahaskett1961@gmail.com

Michael Tucker
Michael Tucker

Section 3 Director
liberty4gp@aol.com

Jason Reeves
Jason Reeves

Section 4 Director
reevesje23@gmail.com

Oregon Missionaries

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Brian & Cora Huffman

Hillsboro/Orenco Station
brianh238@yahoo.com

Ron & Michelle Peterson
Ron & Michelle Peterson

St. Helens, Oregon
pastor@sainthelenschurch.com

Frank & Kathleen Vandevender
Frank & Kathleen Vandevender

McMinnville, Oregon
gfvande@yahoo.com

Chad & Tasia Williams
Chad & Tasia Williams

Portland Metro - Tanasbourne
portlandlife.church

Target Cities

Ashland
Dallas
Keizer
La Pine
Lebanon
Lincoln City
Madras
Monmouth
Myrtle Creek
Portland
Silverton
Stayton
Sweet Home
Ashland

Ashland, ORAshland is a city in Jackson County, near Interstate 5 and the California border, and located in the south end of the Rogue Valley. It was named after Ashland County, Ohio, point of origin of Abel Helman and other founders, and secondarily for Ashland, Kentucky, where other founders had family connections. It officially became a town with the name Ashland Mills in 1855. As of July 1, 2011, the city had a total population of 20,255. It is the home of Southern Oregon University and the internationally renowned Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

History

Prior to the arrival of settlers in mid-19th century, Shasta Indians lived in the valley along the creek approximately where Ashland is located. Early Hudson's Bay Company hunters and trappers, following the Siskiyou Trail, passed through the site in the 1820s. In the late 1840s, settlers (mostly American) following the Applegate Trail began passing through the area. By the early 1850s, the Donation Land Act brought many white settlers into the Rogue Valley and in conflict with its native people. These often violent clashes continued until 1856.

In 1851, gold was discovered at Rich Gulch, a tributary of Jackson Creek, and a tent city developed on its banks, the area now known as Jacksonville. Settlers soon arrived to the Ashland area in January 1852, including Abel Helman, Eber Emery and his brother James Emery, Robert Hargadine and others. In order to capitalize on mining in nearby Jacksonville, Helman and the Emerys established a lumber mill on Ashland Creek.

During the 1860s and 1870s the community grew, establishing a school, churches and other businesses. In 1871, the Post Office dropped "Mills" from Ashland's name. On November 4, 1872 Reverend J. H. Skidmore founded the Ashland Academy—it eventually became Southern Oregon University.

In December 1887, Portland, Oregon, and San Francisco, California, were joined by rail at Ashland. Until 1926, when most rail service began taking a different route (east through Klamath Falls to avoid the steep grade through the Siskiyou Mountains) Ashland thrived on rail trade. This was especially the case with orchard products, such as the famous Ashland peach, which won top honors at the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago.

In 1908, the Women's Civic Improvement Club petitioned for the creation of a park—Ashland Canyon Park—along Ashland Creek. The discovery of Lithia water around the same time led to a plan to establish a mineral spa at the park. Using the resulting funding, the town engaged John McLaren, landscape architect of San Francisco's Golden Gate Park, to design the park. This also resulted in a name change, first to Lithia Springs Park and then to Lithia Park.

The oldest working telephone booth in Oregon, made of wood with a tin ceiling, is located in downtown Ashland in the Columbia Hotel. The Columbia Hotel, built in 1910 as part of the Enders Building, is the oldest hotel in Ashland and continues to flourish today. The building was originally home of the largest mercantile establishment between Sacramento and Portland in the period 1910 to 1928.

During the Fourth of July celebration in 1935, Angus L. Bowmer arranged the first performances of what would become the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. The festival grew during the 20th century, and has become an award-winning and internationally-known regional theater company.

Geography

Ashland is located in the foothills of the Siskiyou and Cascade ranges, about 15 miles (24 km) north of the California border on Interstate 5.

The city is 350 miles (560 km) north of San Francisco and 285 miles (459 km) south of Portland in an area once proposed to become the State of Jefferson. It is 90 miles (145 km) from Crater Lake National Park and Oregon Caves National Monument.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.5 square miles (17 km2), none of which is water.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there are 19,522 people in the city organized into 8,537 households, and 4,481 families. The population density is 3,003.1 people per square mile (1,159.6/km²). There are 9,050 housing units at an average density of 1,392.2 per square mile (537.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city is 91.55% White, 1.87% Asian, 1.02% Native American, 0.60% Black or African American, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 1.71% from other races, and 3.11% from two or more races. 3.56% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 8,537 households 25.3% have children under the age of 18, 37.4% have married couples living together, 11.7% have a female householder with no husband present, and 47.5% are non-families. Thirty-three percent of all households are made up of individuals and 10.9% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.14 and the average family size is 2.72.

The age distribution of residents is 18.8% under the age of 18, 17.5% from 18 to 24, 23.3% from 25 to 44, 25.5% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 38 years. For every 100 females there are 85.6 males; for every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 82.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city is $32,670, and the median income for a family is $49,647. Males have a median income of $36,825 versus $30,632 for females. The per capita income for the city is $21,292. 19.6% of the population and 12.5% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 22.0% of those under the age of 18 and 8.5% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line.

For more information, please visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashland,_Oregon
http://www.ashland.or.us/

Downloaded from Wikipedia on January 8, 2012

Dallas

The city of Dallas is the county seat of Polk County. The population was 14,583 at the 2010 census.

Dallas is located on Rickreall Creek, approximately 15 miles west of Salem, at an altitude of 325 feet above sea level. It is part of the Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

Dallas was settled in the 1840s on the north side of Rickreall Creek and was originally named "Cynthian" or "Cynthiana". A 1947 Itemizer-Observer article (quoted in 100 Years in Polk County: A Centennial Background) states: "[T]he town was called Cynthiana after Cynthiana, Ky., so named by Mrs. Thos. Lovelady." The History of Polk County Oregon, 1987, Page 12, states: "To Mrs. Thomas J. Lovelady was given the honor of naming the new settlement and she selected the name after her home town of Cynthiana, Kentucky."

Another source claims that the origin of the name may come from the name of Jesse Applegate's wife, Cynthia Ann. However, she lived in the Salt Creek area of northern Polk County and, according to the 1850 Federal Census, had already left Polk County by 1850.

Dallas post office was established in 1852. In 1856 the town was moved more than a mile south because of an inadequate supply of water.

Dallas was in competition with Independence to be the county seat and the citizens of Dallas raised $17,000 in order to have a branch of the narrow gauge railroad come to their town, thus securing the honor. The line was built from 1878–80. A more suitable name for a county seat was needed, and since George Mifflin Dallas was vice-president under James K. Polk, for whom the county was named, "Dallas" was a natural choice.

Dallas was incorporated as a town in 1874, and as a city in 1901.

Gerlinger Family

Louis Gerlinger, Sr., incorporated the Salem, Falls City and Western Railway Company late in October 1901 and announced plans to build a railroad from the Willamette River at Salem to the mouth of the Siletz River on the Oregon Coast, a distance of 65 miles.

In 1902, Louis's son George T. Gerlinger organized a group of investors to build railroad lines in the area.

On May 29, 1903, the first train ran from Dallas to Falls City. At the end of June, passenger trains began regularly scheduled trips to and from Dallas and Falls City each day; the nine-mile, forty-minute, one-way trip cost 35 cents.

Willamette Industries was founded in Dallas in 1906. At that time the company name was Willamette Valley Lumber Company. Louis Gerlinger, Sr. was president of the new company and H.L. Pittock, vice president. George T. Gerlinger served as secretary and manager while F.W. Leadbetter was treasurer. George Cone served as director and mill superintendent. In 1967 Willamette Valley Lumber and several others merged to become Willamette Industries.

In March 2002, Willamette Industries was officially acquired by Weyerhaeuser Company in a hostile takeover. In early 2009, Weyerhaeuser's Mill formally closed down its Dallas operation.

Interesting Places

Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge is a wildlife refuge totaling 2,492 acres, and home to many Dusky Canada Geese, which nest almost exclusively in the Willamette Valley. Baskett Slough is located on Highway 22, just outside of Dallas, though it has a Dallas address. "A small number of Bald Eagles winter on the refuge. In addition to the abundant bird life, 30 species of mammals, 8 species of amphibians, and 10 species of reptiles occur here. The largest remaining population of Fender's blue butterfly is found on the refuge."

There is also an indoor aquatic center, housing a water slide, relaxation tub, current pool, and toddler pool.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.81 square miles (12.5 km2), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2010, there were 14,583 people. The population density was 3,031.8 people per square mile (1,170.4/km²). There were 6,137 housing units at an average density of 1,275.9 per square mile (492.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.31% White, 0.23% African American, 2.03% Native American, 0.76% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 1.61% from other races, and 2.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.95% of the population.

In 2000, there were 4,672 households out of which 35.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.0% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.8% were non-families. 24.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.02.

In 2000, the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 17.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 92.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.2 males.

The median income in 2000 for a household in the city was $35,967, and the median income for a family was $45,156. Males had a median income of $34,271 versus $22,941 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,734. About 7.8% of families and 9.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.2% of those under age 18 and 5.8% of those age 65 or over.

For more information please visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dallas,_Oregon
https://www.ci.dallas.or.us/

Downloaded from Wikipedia on January 5, 2012
Image Attribution: Doug Kerr

Keizer

Keizer is a city in Marion County along the 45th parallel. It was named for Thomas Dove and John Brooks Keizer, two pioneers who arrived in the Wagon Train of 1843, and later filed donation land claims. The population was 36,278 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

The original settlement was at Keizer Bottom, near the banks of the Willamette River. The community was named after Thomas Dove Keizur, one of its first settlers. Somewhere in the translation of donation land claim records, his name was misspelled. The settlement suffered in the flood of 1861, and the inhabitants rebuilt their homes on higher ground. Further floods in 1943, 1945, 1946 and 1948 hampered the growth of the community, and it was not until dams were built in the 1950s to regulate the flow of the Willamette that Keizer began to flourish.

Many times the City of Salem tried to annex the growing community adjacent to its city limits. Beginning in 1964, a number of Keizer residents tried to convince the people of Keizer that it would be cheaper and better to form their own city. It was not until November 2, 1982, when, with the support of the nearby unincorporated community of Clear Lake, residents voted to make Keizer a city.

Keizer Bottom is now the site of Keizer Rapids Park, a public park whose attractions include a dog park, playground, boat-in camping, nature trails, and sport courts.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.3 square miles (19 km2), of which 7.1 square miles (18 km2) is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) (2.03%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 32,203 people, 12,110 households, and 8,646 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,455.7 people per square mile (1,719.7/km²). There were 12,774 housing units at an average density of 1,767.4 per square mile (682.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 85.52% White, 0.75% African American, 1.38% Native American, 1.49% Asian, 0.20% Pacific Islander, 7.22% from other races, and 3.44% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.27% of the population.

There were 12,110 households out of which 35.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.8% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.6% were non-families. 22.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.07. In the city the population was 27.7% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 94.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.2 males The median income for a household in the city was $45,052, and the median income for a family was $49,977. Males had a median income of $37,138 versus $27,032 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,119. About 6.2% of families and 9.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.7% of those under age 18 and 7.6% of those age 65 or over.

For more information please visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keizer,_Oregon
https://www.keizer.org/

Downloaded from Wikipedia on January 5, 2012

La Pine

La Pine is a city in Deschutes County, incorporated on December 7, 2006.

La Pine is part of the Bend, Oregon Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 5,799 at the 2000 census, at which time it was a census-designated place (CDP). La Pine is in an isolated area of Central Oregon, consisting of a loose collection of homes and businesses along U.S. Highway 97 about 30 miles (48 km) southwest of Bend. Most of the residential development is concealed from the highway itself. Several peaks of the Cascade Range are prominently visible from the community.

La Pine is in the valley of the Little Deschutes River, a tributary of the Deschutes River. The river provides recreational opportunities such as fishing, swimming, canoeing, and other leisure activities.

History

La Pine was founded in the 19th century with Huntington Road as the main street. The fledgling community quickly grew and prospered until the combination of a failed community water system and rapid growth of Bend caused a slowdown to occur. Today, La Pine is beginning to grow once again, but this time as a commuter town to Bend, making Deschutes County one of the fastest growing counties in America.

La Pine had remained an unincorporated community for many years. A measure to incorporate in the 2000 elections was rejected by a 2-1 ratio. In the elections of 2006, another incorporation measure was placed on the ballot (one of two such measures in Oregon that year; the other being for Bull Mountain, Oregon). The La Pine measure passed, creating the City of La Pine. The city occupies 7 square miles (18 km2), and at the time of incorporation, had 1,585 residents as of December 2006. Much of the former census-designated area lies outside the city limits.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP had a total area of 29.3 square miles (76 km2), all land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 5,799 people, 2,331 households, and 1,699 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 197.7 people per square mile (76.3/km²). There were 2,975 housing units at an average density of 101.4 per square mile (39.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.84% White, 0.09% African American, 1.28% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 0.55% from other races, and 1.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.22% of the population.

There were 2,331 households out of which 26.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.3% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.1% were non-families. 20.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.82.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 22.5% from 25 to 44, 28.8% from 45 to 64, and 20.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 99.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.7 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $29,859, and the median income for a family was $33,938. Males had a median income of $30,457 versus $20,186 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $15,543. About 9.5% of families and 13.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.4% of those under age 18 and 11.5% of those age 65 or over.

For more information please visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaPine,_Oregon
https://www.ci.la-pine.or.us/index.html

Downloaded from Wikipedia on January 5, 2012
Image Attribution: city-data.com

Lebanon

Lebanon is a city in Linn County. Lebanon is located in northwest Oregon, southeast of Salem. The population was 12,950 at the 2000 census and the 2008 census data shows the population at 15,397.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.4 square miles (14 km2), of which, 5.2 square miles (13 km2) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) of it (2.96%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 12,950 people, 5,078 households, and 3,442 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,467.7 people per square mile (952.4/km²). There were 5,457 housing units at an average density of 1,039.9 per square mile (401.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.98% White, 0.17% African American, 1.03% Native American, 0.96% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 1.41% from other races, and 2.37% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.69% of the population.

There were 5,078 households out of which 33.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.2% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.2% were non-families. 27.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.02.

The city's age distribution has 27.0% under 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 19.7% from 45 to 64, and 17.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 91.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $31,231, and the median income for a family was $37,818. Males had a median income of $32,448 versus $24,796 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,968. About 14.4% of families and 15.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.8% of those under age 18 and 7.9% of those age 65 or over.

For more information please visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lebanon,_Oregon
https://www.ci.lebanon.or.us/

Downloaded from Wikipedia on January 5, 2012

Lincoln City

Lincoln City, Oregon is a city in Lincoln County. It is named after the county. The population was 7,930 at the 2010 census.

History

Lincoln City was incorporated on March 3, 1965, uniting the cities of Delake, Oceanlake and Taft, and the unincorporated communities of Cutler City and Nelscott. These were adjacent communities along U.S. Route 101, which serves as Lincoln City's main street. The name "Lincoln City" was chosen from contest entries submitted by local school children. The contest was held when it was determined that using one of the five communities' names would be too controversial.

Economy

In 1995 the Confederated Tribes of Siletz opened Chinook Winds Casino at the northern end of the city on property overlooking the Pacific Ocean.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.4 square miles (14 km2), of which 5.3 square miles (14 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2), or 0.56%, is water.

Lincoln City is home to one of the world's shortest rivers, the D River, connecting Devils Lake with the Pacific Ocean.

Climate

The average temperature in January is a low of 36F, and in August the average high is 71F. The hottest month on average is August, while the coldest is January. The driest month on average is July, with December being the wettest. The average annual precipitation is 97.270". The average July afternoon humidity is 75%, and the average January afternoon humidity is 84%.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 7,437 people, 3,371 households, and 1,860 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,394.5 people per square mile (538.7/km²). There were 4,990 housing units at an average density of 935.6 per square mile (361.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 88.40% White, 0.46% African American, 3.12% Native American, 1.02% Asian, 0.35% Pacific Islander, 3.01% from other races, and 3.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.22% of the population.

There were 3,371 households out of which 24.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.2% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.8% were non-families. 36.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.18 and the average family size was 2.80.

In the city the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 24.0% from 25 to 44, 26.2% from 45 to 64, and 19.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 84.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $24,959, and the median income for a family was $31,783. Males had a median income of $26,667 versus $21,483 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,597. About 12.5% of families and 16.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.4% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.

For more information please visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_City,_Oregon
https://www.lincolncity.org/

Downloaded from Wikipedia on January 5, 2012

Madras

Madras is a city in Jefferson County. Originally called "The Basin" after the circular valley the city is located in, it is unclear as to whether Madras was named in 1903 for the cotton fabric called "Madras" that originated in the Madras (now Chennai) area in India, or from the city of Chennai, then known as "Madras". The population was 6,046 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Jefferson County.

History

Madras was incorporated as a city in 1911. An Army Air Corps base was built nearby during World War II. This airfield now serves as City-County Airport. Homesteads about 5 miles (8 km) north of the city on Agency Plains were based on dryland wheat.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.02 square miles (13.0 km2), all land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 5,078 people, 1,801 households, and 1,251 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,326.9 people per square mile (899.4/km²). There were 1,952 housing units at an average density of 894.5 per square mile (345.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 63.55% White, 0.59% African American, 6.14% Native American, 0.55% Asian, 0.35% Pacific Islander, 24.56% from other races, and 4.25% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 35.74% of the population.

There were 1,801 households out of which 41.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.2% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.32.

In the city the population was spread out with 33.1% under the age of 18, 10.6% from 18 to 24, 29.7% from 25 to 44, 16.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,103, and the median income for a family was $33,275. Males had a median income of $27,656 versus $19,464 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,937. About 15.2% of families and 19.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.3% of those under age 18 and 10.0% of those age 65 or over.

For more information please visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madras,_Oregon
https://www.ci.madras.or.us/

Downloaded from Wikipedia on January 5, 2012
Image Attribution: city-data.com

Monmouth

Monmouth is a city in Polk County. It was named for Monmouth, Illinois, the origin of its earliest settlers. The population has reached 9,726 as of the 2010 census, It is part of the Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

Monmouth was settled in 1853 by a group of pioneers who made a point of allocating 640 acres (2.6 km2) to build both a city and a "college under the auspices of the Christian Church" and proceeds from the sale of these lands were used to found Monmouth University. By the early 1880s the college fell on hard times. In 1882, ownership was transferred to the State of Oregon and it was renamed Oregon State Normal School at Monmouth. It is now known as Western Oregon University.

For decades, Monmouth was a dry town that banned the sale of alcoholic beverages in supermarkets, restaurants and bars. Monmouth's status as the last dry town in Oregon was ended by a popular vote in the November 2002 election. Spurred on by the closure of Monmouth's last grocery store, and a general decline of its retail sector, three local men (John Oberst, Paul Sieber, and Chuck Sheffield) led a referendum campaign to allow the sale of beer and wine. The measure passed 57-43%.

History of Prohibition in Monmouth

Monmouth, Oregon was settled by Elijah Davidson and his Family. Originally a member of the Christian Church of Cameron (Monmouth, Illinois), Davidson was a devout advocate of prohibition. In 1852, sixty-three-year-old Elijah Davidson and his family set out for Oregon Territory By 1854, more than a dozen Disciples families from Monmouth, many of them related to each other or to Davidson, had joined him.[5] In February 1859, Davidson and other trustees efforts to prohibit the importation, exportation, sale, and consumption of alcohol in Monmouth became a reality. One of the main arguments Davidson and his fellow religious supporters used to push prohibition legislation was, "to enable them to suppress and prevent nuisances, to render the possession of life and property more secure, [and] to enable them to improve and embellish the streets of the town." [5]

Despite the incredible efforts of certain merchants to repeal prohibition in Monmouth throughout its history, their efforts proved useless. What was most important to the local religious community was to keep prohibition around for the betterment of the social order of Monmouth. Although opponents raised religious, moral, economic, and quality-of-life arguments similar to those preached during the nineteenth century, they also brought two new arguments to center stage: the historic nature of Monmouth's prohibition and the uniqueness that local prohibition brought to the town.

Eventually, as time went on, prohibition ordinance started to take flight throughout the local community of Monmouth. Although support of prohibition came in large numbers in Monmouth, there were signs that it was starting to become more and more detrimental to the social, economic, and religious aspects of the community. Some claim that prohibition had reduced property values, and one rumor predicted that university tuition would increase if the ordinance was repealed.

In November 2002, prohibition was repealed through the election, and Monmouth ended its long tenure as the "Dryest Town in the U.S."

Geography

It is about 15 miles (24 km) west of Salem, Oregon on Oregon Route 99W.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.9 square miles (4.9 km2), all of it land.[6]

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 7,741 people, 2,757 households, and 1,488 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,004.3 people per square mile (1,548.6/km²). There were 2,934 housing units at an average density of 1,517.7 per square mile (587.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 85.67% White, 0.92% African American, 1.05% Native American, 2.04% Asian, 0.74% Pacific Islander, 6.21% from other races, and 3.37% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.73% of the population.

There were 2,757 households out of which 26.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.7% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 46.0% were non-families. 24.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the city the population was spread out with 19.5% under the age of 18, 35.9% from 18 to 24, 21.2% from 25 to 44, 14.5% from 45 to 64, and 8.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 23 years. For every 100 females there were 86.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,256, and the median income for a family was $48,600. Males had a median income of $33,500 versus $25,185 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,474. About 7.1% of families and 24.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.1% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over.

For more information please visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monmouth,_Oregon
https://www.ci.monmouth.or.us/

Myrtle Creek

Myrtle Creek is a city in Douglas County. The population was 3,419 at the 2000 census. It is the birthplace of U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.7 km2), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 3,419 people, 1,339 households, and 914 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,952.5 people per square mile (754.3/km²). There were 1,437 housing units at an average density of 820.6 per square mile (317.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.45% White, 0.15% African American, 2.14% Native American, 0.88% Asian, 0.67% from other races, and 2.72% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.07% of the population.

There were 1,339 households out of which 34.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.9% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.7% were non-families. 26.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.5% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 25.7% from 25 to 44, 22.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 91.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,658, and the median income for a family was $40,000. Males had a median income of $30,559 versus $22,102 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,813. About 14.4% of families and 17.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.9% of those under age 18 and 13.5% of those age 65 or over.

For more information please visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrtle_Creek,_Oregon
https://cityofmyrtlecreek.com/

Downloaded from Wikipedia on January 5, 2012

Portland

Portland is approved by North American Missions as a Metro Missions city!

Portland is a city located in the Pacific Northwest, near the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia rivers in the U.S. state of Oregon. As of the 2010 Census, it had a population of 583,776, making it the 29th most populous city in the United States. Portland is Oregon's most populous city, and the third most populous city in the Pacific Northwest, after Seattle, Washington and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Approximately 2,260,000 people live in the Portland metropolitan area (MSA), the 23rd most populous in the United States.

Portland was incorporated in 1851 and is the county seat of Multnomah County. The city extends west into the Cedar Mill neighborhood in Washington County and south towards Lake Oswego in Clackamas County. With a commission-based government headed by a mayor and four other commissioners, the city and region are noted for strong land-use planning and investment in light rail, supported by Metro, a distinctive regional government. Because of its public transportation networks and efficient land use planning, Portland has been referred to as one of the most environmentally friendly, or "green", cities in the world.

Located in the Marine west coast climate region, Portland has a climate marked by warm, dry summers and wet but mild winters. This climate is ideal for growing roses, and for more than a century, Portland has been known as "The City of Roses" with many rose gardens—most prominently the International Rose Test Garden. The city is also known for its large number of microbreweries and microdistilleries, as well as its coffee enthusiasm. It is also the home of the Timbers MLS team and the Trail Blazers NBA team.

History

The land today occupied by Multnomah County was inhabited for centuries by two bands of Upper Chinook Indians. The Multnomah people settled on and around Sauvie Island and the Cascades Indians settled along the Columbia Gorge. These groups fished and traded along the river and gathered berries, wapato and other root vegetables. The nearby Tualatin Plains provided prime hunting grounds. The later settlement of Portland started as a spot known as "the clearing," which was on the banks of the Willamette about halfway between Oregon City and Fort Vancouver. In 1843, William Overton saw great commercial potential for this land but lacked the funds required to file a land claim. He struck a bargain with his partner, Asa Lovejoy of Boston, Massachusetts: for 25¢, Overton would share his claim to the 640 acres (2.6 km2) site. Overton later sold his half of the claim to Francis W. Pettygrove of Portland, Maine. Pettygrove and Lovejoy each wished to name the new city after his respective home town. In 1845, this controversy was settled with a coin toss, which Pettygrove won in a series of two out of three tosses. The coin used for this decision, now known as the Portland Penny, is on display in the headquarters of the Oregon Historical Society.

At the time of its incorporation on February 8, 1851 Portland had over 800 inhabitants, a steam sawmill, a log cabin hotel, and a newspaper, the Weekly Oregonian. By 1879, the population had grown to 17,500. The city merged with Albina and East Portland in 1891, and annexed the cities of Linnton and St. Johns in 1915.

Portland's location, with access both to the Pacific Ocean via the Willamette and the Columbia rivers and to the agricultural Tualatin Valley via the "Great Plank Road" through a canyon in the West Hills (the route of current-day U.S. Route 26), gave it an advantage over nearby ports, and it grew very quickly. It remained the major port in the Pacific Northwest for much of the 19th century, until the 1890s, when Seattle's deepwater harbor was connected to the rest of the mainland by rail, affording an inland route without the treacherous navigation of the Columbia River.

Nicknames

The most common nickname for Portland is The City of Roses, and this became the city's official nickname in 2003. Other nicknames include the City of Bridges, Stumptown, Bridgetown, Rip City, P-Town, Portlandia, and the metonymous PDX.

Geography/Topography

Portland lies at the northern end of Oregon's most populated region, the Willamette Valley. However, as the metropolitan area is culturally and politically distinct from the rest of the valley, local usage often excludes Portland from the valley proper. Although almost all of Portland lies within Multnomah County, small portions of the city lie within Clackamas and Washington counties with mid-2005 populations estimated at 785 and 1,455, respectively. The Willamette River runs north through the city center, separating the east and west sections of the city before veering northwest to join with the Columbia River (which separates the state of Washington from the state of Oregon) a short distance north of the city.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 145.4 square miles (377 km2). 134.3 square miles (348 km2) of it is land and 11.1 square miles (29 km2), or 7.6%, is water.[31]

Portland lies on top of an extinct Plio-Pleistocene volcanic field known as the Boring Lava Field. The Boring Lava Field includes at least 32 cinder cones such as Mount Tabor, and its center lies in Southeast Portland. The dormant but potentially active volcano Mount Hood to the east of Portland is easily visible from much of the city during clear weather. The active volcano Mount Saint Helens to the north in Washington is visible in the distance from high-elevation locations in the city and is close enough to have dusted the city with volcanic ash after an eruption on May 18, 1980. Mount Adams, another prominent volcano in Washington state to the northeast of Portland, is also visible from parts of the city.

Climate

Portland experiences a temperate climate that is usually described as oceanic with mild, damp winters and relatively dry, warm summers. Like much of the Pacific Northwest, according to the Köppen climate classification it falls within the cool, dry-summer subtropical zone (Csb), also referred to as cool-summer Mediterranean, because of its relatively dry summers. Other climate classification systems, such as Trewartha, place it firmly in the Oceanic zone (Do).

Summers in Portland are warm, sunny and rather dry, with August, the warmest month, having an average daily high temperature of 79.7 °F (26.5 °C), and much larger day-night variation than in winter. Because of its inland location and when there is an absence of a sea breeze, heatwaves occur (in particular during the months of July and August) with air temperatures sometimes rising over 100 °F (38 °C), but 90 °F (32 °C) is more commonplace, occurring 13 days per annum.[37] Winters are normally mild, and very moist, with January averaging 39.9 °F (4.4 °C). Lows, though usually above freezing, can reach that mark or below 37 nights per year, however. Cold snaps are short-lived, and snowfall occurs no more than a few times per year, although the city has been known to see major snow and ice storms because of the cold air outflow from the Columbia River Gorge. The city's winter snowfall totals have ranged from just a trace on many occasions, to 60.9 inches (154.7 cm) in 1892–93. Spring can bring rather unpredictable weather, resulting from warm spells, to thunderstorms rolling off the Cascade Range. The rainfall averages an equivalent 37.5 inches (950 mm) per year in downtown Portland, spread over 155 days a year. The lowest temperature ever recorded in Portland was −3 °F (−19 °C), set on February 2, 1950.[38] The highest temperature ever recorded was 107 °F (42 °C), set on July 30, 1965 as well as August 8 and 10, 1981. Temperatures of 100 °F (38 °C) have been recorded in each of the months from May through September.

Demographics

As of 2010, there are an estimated 583,776 people residing in the city, organized into 235,508 households. The population density is 4,375.2 people per square mile. There are 265,439 housing units at an average density of 1989.4 per square mile (1,236.3/km²). Population growth in Portland increased 10.3% between 2000 and 2010.[124] Population growth in the Portland metropolitan area has outpaced the national average during the last decade, with 2008 estimates showing an 80% chance of population growth in excess of 60% over the next 50 years.

2010 Census data

The racial makeup of the city was 73.9% White (405,938), 8.8% Hispanic or Latino (of any race) (48,285), 7.8% Asian (42,785), 7.8% Black or African American (42,711), 2.8% Native American (15,523), 0.6% Pacific Islander (3,564), and 3.0% from other races (16,347).

Out of 223,737 households, 24.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.1% are married couples living together, 10.8% have a female householder with no husband present, and 47.1% are non-families. 34.6% of all households are made up of individuals and 9% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.3 and the average family size is 3.

The age distribution was 21.1% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 34.7% from 25 to 44, 22.4% from 45 to 64, and 11.6% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 35 years. For every 100 females there are 97.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 95.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city is $40,146, and the median income for a family is $50,271. Males have a reported median income of $35,279 versus $29,344 reported for females. The per capita income for the city is $22,643. 13.1% of the population and 8.5% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 15.7% of those under the age of 18 and 10.4% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. Figures delineating the income levels based on race are not available at this time.

However, though the population of the city is increasing, the total population of children is diminishing, which has put pressure on the public school system to close schools. A 2005 study found that Portland is now educating fewer children than it did in 1925, despite the city's population having almost doubled since then, and the city will have to close the equivalent of three to four elementary schools each year for the next decade.

In 1940, Portland's African-American population was approximately 2,000 and largely consisted of railroad employees and their families. During the war-time liberty ship construction boom, the need for workers drew many blacks to the city. The new influx of blacks settled in specific neighborhoods, such as the Albina district and Vanport. The May 1948 flood which destroyed Vanport eliminated the only integrated neighborhood, and an influx of blacks into the NE quadrant of the city continued. At 7.90%, Portland's African American population is nearly four times the state average. Over two thirds of Oregon's African-American residents live in Portland. As of the 2000 census, three of its high schools (Cleveland, Lincoln and Wilson) were over 70% white, reflecting the overall population, while Jefferson High School was 87% non-white. The remaining six schools have a higher number of non-whites, including blacks and Asians. Hispanic students average from 3.3% at Wilson to 31% at Roosevelt.

With about 12,000 Vietnamese residing in the city proper, Portland has one of the largest Vietnamese populations in America per capita. According to statistics there are 21,000 Pacific Islanders in Portland, making up 4% of the population.

The city of Portland has the 7th highest LGBT population in the country, with 8.8% of residents identifying as homosexual, and the metro area ranks 4th in the nation at 6.1%.

Education

Portland is served by six public school districts and many private schools. Portland Public Schools is the largest school district. There are also many colleges and universities- the largest being Portland Community College, Portland State University, and Oregon Health & Science University. The city is also home to such private universities as the University of Portland, Reed College, and Lewis & Clark College.

Oregon Museum of Science and Industry

Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI), which includes many hands on activities for adults and children. OMSI consists of five main halls, most of which, consist of smaller laboratories: Earth Science Hall, Life Science Hall, Turbine Hall, Science Playground, and Featured Exhibit Hall. The Featured Exhibit Hall has a new exhibit every few months. The laboratories are Chemistry, Physics, Technology, Life, Paleontology, and Watershed. OMSI has many other unique attractions, such as the USS Blueback (SS-581), the OMNIMAX Dome Theater, and OMSI's Kendall Planetarium. The USS Blueback was the last non-nuclear fast attack submarine to join the US Navy and OMSI offers daily tours. The OMNIMAX Dome Theater is a variant of the IMAX motion picture format, where the movie is projected onto a domed projection surface. The projection surface at OMSI's OMNIMAX Dome Theater is 6,532 sq ft (606.8 m2). The OMNIMAX Theater uses the largest frame in the motion picture industry and the frames are ten times the size of the standard 35mm film. OMSI's Kendall Planetarium is the largest and most technologically advanced planetarium in the Pacific Northwest. OMSI is located at 1945 SE Water Ave. OMSI is built right up next to the river and is also conveniently located near the entrance to the Springwater Corridor and Eastbank Esplanade pedestrian and bike trails.

Portland Art Museum

The Portland Art Museum owns the city's largest art collection and presents a variety of touring exhibitions each year and with the recent addition of the Modern and Contemporary Art wing it became one of the United States' twenty-five largest museums.

Oregon History Museum

The Oregon History Museum was founded in 1898. The Oregon History Museum has a variety of books, film, pictures, artifacts, and maps dating back throughout Oregon's history. The Oregon History Museum has one of the most extensive collections of state history materials in the USA.

The Portland Children's Museum

The Portland Children's Museum is a museum specifically geared for early childhood development. This museum has many topics, and many of their exhibits rotate, to keep the information fresh. The Portland Children's Museum also supports a small charter school for elementary children.

Crime

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Report in 2009, Portland ranked 53rd in violent crime out of the top 75 U.S. cities with a population greater than 250,000. The murder rate in Portland over the last five years (2005–2009) has averaged 3.9 murders per 100,000 people per year, which is lower than the national average. For crimes other than murder, Portland is generally somewhat higher than the national average. According to the Portland Police, Killingsworth St., 82nd Ave., and the St. Johns Woods Apartments are the most dangerous areas of the city. In October, 2009, the Forbes magazine rated Portland as the third safest city in America.

For more information please visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portland,_Oregon
https://www.portlandonline.com/

Downloaded from Wikipedia on January 5, 2012

Silverton

Silverton is a city in Marion County, along the 45th parallel. The population was 7,414 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Unlike most small communities in Western Oregon in the nineteenth century, Silverton was laid out largely around its local environment. Instead of the rigid north-south grid of the township and range system, in 1854, Silverton's founder Polly Coon Price, planned the town around a large old Oregon White Oak, locating the town square around it. She named the town Silverton after Silver Creek, which flowed by the several hundred yards to the west of the oak. The tree had been a meeting spot along the Santiam Trail for the local Native Americans. Silverton is located on the eastern edge of the Willamette Valley, at the base of the Waldo Hills, which are foothills of the Cascade Range.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.0 km2), all land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2011, there were 15,988 people, and 5,517 households in the city. The population density was 90 people per square mile (1,048.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 88.33% White, 0.26% African American, 1.14% Native American, 12.53% Hispanic, and 9.73% claim Other.

There were 5,517 households out of which 52.29% were married couples living together, and 41.71% were non-families. The average household size is 2.88.

In the city the population was spread out with 31.8% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 88.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $38,429, and the median income for a family was $46,196. Males had a median income of $34,707 versus $24,479 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,062. About 10.4% of families and 13.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.7% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.

For more information please visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silverton,_Oregon
https://www.silverton.or.us/

Downloaded from Wikipedia on January 5, 2012

Stayton

Stayton is a city in Marion County, located 12 miles (19 km) southeast of the state capital, Salem, on Oregon Route 22. It is south of Sublimity and east of Aumsville. Located on the North Santiam River, Stayton is a regional agricultural and light manufacturing center. The population was 6,816 at the 2000 census. The 2007 population estimate is 7,765.[3] It is part of the Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

Stayton was founded in 1872 by Drury Smith Stayton, who purchased the town site in 1866 and built a carding mill and sawmill on a watercourse of the North Santiam River. A ferry crossing of the Santiam River operated from 1876 until a bridge was constructed in 1888. By 1880, a laundry had been established by Kee Sing and Tom. The first newspaper, The Stayton Sun, was published in 1889 by T. H. McGill.

The founder of Stayton, Drury Stayton, originally wanted to name the city after his daughter, Florence Stayton. After his petition was denied by the post office because another city in Oregon was named Florence, he chose Stayton and named a street after his daughter.

Points of interest

Local attractions include Pioneer Park with the Stayton-Jordan covered bridge. A copy of the Jordan Bridge that spanned Thomas Creek east of Scio, it was moved to the park in 1988. Destroyed by fire in 1994, it was rebuilt and painted white. It is used for social occasions such as weddings. Kingston Prairie Preserve, 3 miles (4.8 km) southeast of Stayton, protects a remnant of the native prairie that was once common in the central Willamette Valley.[6] Silver Falls State Park is northeast of Stayton; it is the largest state park in Oregon and a major tourist destination in the region, popular for its camping, and for its waterfalls.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.0 km2), of which 2.7 square miles (7.0 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) (1.47%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 6,816 people, 2,519 households, and 1,851 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,525.3 people per square mile (974.7/km²). There were 2,654 housing units at an average density of 983.3 per square mile (379.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 90.95% White, 0.13% African American, 1.50% Native American, 0.62% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 3.84% from other races, and 2.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.18% of the population.

There were 2,519 households out of which 41.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.4% were married couples living together, 14.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.5% were non-families. 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the city the population was spread out with 30.9% under the age of 18, 10.0% from 18 to 24, 27.7% from 25 to 44, 19.2% from 45 to 64, and 12.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $34,004, and the median income for a family was $41,389. Males had a median income of $32,437 versus $24,067 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,740. About 11.5% of families and 14.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.6% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over.

For more information visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stayton,_Oregon
https://www.staytonoregon.gov/

Downloaded from Wikipedia on January 5, 2012

Sweet Home

Sweet Home is a city in Linn County. The population was 8,016 at the 2000 census. Sweet Home is sometimes referred to as the "Gateway to the Santiam Playground", due to its proximity to nearby lakes, rivers and the Cascade Mountains.

History

The Sweet Home Valley of the South Santiam River was first settled in 1851. By 1865 a freight wagon and livestock toll road extended from the Sweet Home Valley across Santiam Pass in the Cascades to Camp Polk in Central Oregon. The Santiam Wagon Road was a vital means of supplying livestock and goods from the Willamette Valley to Central Oregon and transporting wool from east of the Cascades back to Western Oregon woolen mills. The wagon road collected tolls until around 1921. Competition with railroads that extended south from the Columbia River into Central Oregon, and the newly opened McKenzie Pass highway in the 1930s made the wagon road obsolete by around 1939. Later, U.S. Route 20 was constructed across much the same route as the Santiam Wagon Road. In the 1990s, efforts began to restore abandoned sections of the Santiam Wagon Road to hiking and other recreational activities.

The first community in the Sweet Home Valley was named Buckhead after the name of the Buckland saloon on nearby Ames Creek. Another community a short distance from Buckhead was called Mossville. By the 1880s, the two communities had expanded towards each other and the combined village was named Sweet Home. The City of Sweet Home was incorporated in 1893. By the 1980s, Sweet Home had expanded to include the community of Foster.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.8 square miles (15 km2), of which, 5.3 square miles (14 km2) of it is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km2) of it (7.64%) is water.

Sweet home is located near the junction of Oregon Route 228 and U.S. Route 20.

The Sweet Home region is rich in arsenic, posing a problem for the residents who obtain drinking water from the groundwater.

Several investigations have attempted to identify the source of the arsenic, or find a way to remove it. It appears to be abundant in the area's bedrock.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 8,016 people, 3,063 households, and 2,131 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,504.4 people per square mile (580.7/km²). There were 3,347 housing units at an average density of 628.2 per square mile (242.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.64% White, 0.25% Black or African American, 1.66% Native American, 0.61% Asian, 0.15% Pacific Islander, 1.00% from other races, and 2.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.09% of the population.

There were 3,063 households out of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.2% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.4% were non-families. 25.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 25.3% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 17.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 94.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $31,030, and the median income for a family was $35,833. Males had a median income of $32,866 versus $20,833 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,548. About 14.0% of families and 17.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.1% of those under age 18 and 11.1% of those age 65 or over.

For more information visit one of the following sites:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_Home,_Oregon
https://www.ci.sweet-home.or.us/

Downloaded from Wikipedia on January 5, 2012

Prison/Jail

Purpose & Vision

The Words of Jesus Christ drive the mission of CPF: “I was in prison, and ye came to me… Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these…, ye have done it unto me” (Matthew 25:36, 40)

The ministry of CPF bears witness to the truth that no life is beyond the reach of God’s grace and power to transform.

Working toward the goal of establishing fellowships and ministry in every federal, state, county, and local correctional and transitional-living facility throughout North America, the Mission of CPF is:

Centered in Jesus Christ – in obedience to His command, “Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature.” (Mark 16:15).

Grounded in God’s Word, the Bible — in our lives and in our message, “All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: that the man of God may be perfect thoroughly furnished unto all good works” (II Timothy 3:16-17).

Dependent upon Prayer — as the foundation and power for anointed ministry, “And when they had prayed, the place was shaken where they were assembled together…” (Acts 4:31).

Partnered with the Church — as the Biblical means and partnership for effective ministry, “…the whole body fitly joined together and compacted by that which every joint supplieth, according to the effectual working in the measure of every part, maketh increase of the body…” (Ephesians 4:16).

Committed to Unity and Spiritual Maturity — with all believers in Jesus Christ, “Till we all come in the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a perfect man, unto the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ:” (Ephesians 4:13).

Commissioned to Evangelize and Disciple — in obedience to Jesus’ command, “And that repentance, and remission of sins should be preached in his name among all nations… and behold, I send the promise of my Father upon you; but tarry… until ye be endued with power from on high.” (Luke 24:47-49)

Compelled to Minister Grace and Truth — in accordance with Biblical instruction and revelation, “And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth. For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ (John 1:14, 17).

Confirmed by the Power and Working of the Holy Spirit — in accordance with Biblical confirmation, “And they went forth, and preached every where, the Lord working with them, and confirming the word with signs following. And my speech and my preaching was not with enticing words of man’s wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power; that your faith should not stand in the wisdom of men, but in the power of God” (Mark 16:20, I Corinthians 2:4,5).

Loving Others — by treating all people with grace, trust, and respect, “By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another” (John 13:35).

Seeking Excellence — by demonstrating integrity and wise stewardship, “Moreover it is required in stewards, that a man be found faithful. As every man hath received the gift, even so minister the same one to another, as good stewards of the manifold grace of God” (I Corinthians 4:2, I Peter 4:10).

Christian Prisoner Fellowship

Seminars & Training

On site volunteer training is available upon request. Please contact Rev. Doug Lethin for more information at (503) 932-6360 or by email.

Facilities Ministering In

ODOC Facilities

OSP Oregon State Penitentiary | Friday 1:00-3:00 p.m.
OSCI; Oregon State Correctional Institution | Friday 7:00-9:00 p.m.
SCI; Santiam Correctional Institution | Saturday 7:00-9:00 p.m.
TRCI; Two Rivers Correctional Institution | Saturday PM
SRCI; Snake River Correctional Institution | Pending
CRCI; Columbia River Correctional Institution | Sunday 6:00-7:30 p.m.

County Facilities

Marion County, Salem
Work Release Center | Sunday 8:00-9:00 a.m.
Main Jail, English | Friday Afternoon
Main Jail, Spanish |

Lane County, Albany
Main Jail, English |

District Officials

Doug Lethin
Doug Lethin

Prison Chaplain
dlethin@remodelsalem.com

Tommy Hoover
Tommy Hoover